Safe Campus

Archived Statements

What is Sexual Violence?

Sexual violence is any violence, physical or psychological, carried out through sexual means or by targeting sexuality. This includes sexual abuse, sexual assault or rape. It also includes sexual harassment, stalking, indecent or sexualized exposure, degrading sexual imagery, voyeurism, cyber harassment, trafficking and sexual exploitation.

September 12, 2016

On behalf of Western University, I wish to state our position on sexual violence, in particular in relation to a recent incident in which a disturbing message advocating sexual violence was written on the outside of a window of a rental property on Epworth Avenue near Western.

To be clear, sexual violence is not tolerated at Western. The message written on that window, which included the statement 'No means Yes', is a form of sexual violence. Its existence threatened the safety and security of our campus and wider community.

The incident was first brought to the attention of Glenn Matthews, Western’s Housing Mediation Officer, whose role is to resolve problems between students and neighbours. Glenn responded immediately and an investigation was initiated. A subsequent story quoting him appeared in the London Free Press.

First, Western takes full responsibility for not responding to the incident adequately. Given the content of the message, others should have been mobilized immediately to assist the Housing Mediation Officer when the incident came to light, including Western’s Sexual Violence Prevention & Education Coordinator, Campus Community Police Service and London Police Service, to ensure a thorough and appropriate response. To that end, the University is reviewing its response mechanisms in these kinds of serious situations and the current incident is being investigated by London Police, as well as Campus Police as a Code of Student Conduct violation.

It is also important to note Western’s Housing Mediation Officer is not positioned to represent the views of, or speak on behalf of, the University on matters relating to sexual violence and we regret he was put in that position. Glenn has since apologized and expressed sincere regret that his comments dismissed the seriousness of sexual violence and served to damage the University’s initiatives to eliminate such abhorrent activity: “The statement scrawled on the Epworth Avenue address is disgusting and there is no excuse for those words being posted. They have no place in our community, or anywhere. None of these outcomes were my intent and I am sorry my words caused harm or distress to anyone.”

Sadly, we continue to live in a culture that often trivializes sexual violence and blames survivors. This incident serves to reinforce the responsibilities each and every one of us must adopt regarding sexual violence as we work toward shifting that culture to one where consent is the norm.

The following sexual violence awareness and education initiatives have either recently taken place or were planned in advance, however this incident is a stark reminder that we must continue to prioritize sexual violence prevention at Western and work to actively educate our staff, faculty and students to be upstanders, individuals who act to reduce harm and address attitudes and behaviours that are sexually violent.

To learn more about sexual violence prevention and education at Western, please visit www.uwo.ca/sexualviolence.

Jana Luker
Associate Vice-President,
Student Experience
Western University

September 10, 2016

Sexual violence is not tolerated at Western.

As we begin another year, it is particularly important to re-state this message. It is a message that we all must hear and understand.

At Western, we actively work to educate, challenge and influence our community to be upstanders. Upstanders are individuals who act to reduce harm and address attitudes and behaviours that are sexually violent. We all have a shared responsibility to create an environment where we are educated on issues pertaining to sexual violence, survivors are supported and incidents of sexual violence are addressed.   

We cannot ignore that in North America there exists a culture that often trivializes sexual violence and blames survivors. Education programs at Western University are actively working to shift this culture on campus to one where consent is normalized and all individuals are respected through actions and words.

Sexual violence is any violence, physical or psychological, carried out through sexual means or by targeting sexuality, gender identity or gender expression. This includes sexual abuse, sexual assault or rape. It also includes sexual harassment, stalking, indecent or sexualized exposure, degrading sexual imagery, voyeurism, cyber harassment, trafficking and sexual exploitation.

As such, Western condemns any and all incidents that threaten our community through any of these behaviours or actions.

Further, Western is committed to a survivor-centric approach in dealing with sexual assault. From that basis, we also ensure that all acts of sexual violence within our community will be addressed and individuals who have committed an act of sexual violence will be held accountable.

Jana Luker
Associate Vice-President, Student Experience
Western University


Information to know:

In recent years, Western has taken a number of steps to prevent and respond to sexual violence, including:

• Students have multiple ways they can report sexual violence, including to the Sexual Violence Prevention Education Coordinator, residence staff, Equity & Human Rights Services and Campus Community Police Service; and

• Orientation Week programming, for all first-year undergraduate students, includes several keynote addresses on the topic of consent, sexual violence and bystander intervention

• Western is represented at the vice-president level in ongoing discussions with other Ontario universities on best practices in preventing and responding to sexual violence.

• Student Health Services operates extended hours including Saturdays;

The university has a dedicated Sexual Violence Prevention and Education Committee that actively delivers education programs for the Western community. The committee includes voices from across campus, including representatives from Campus Community Police Services, Western’s Centre for Research & Education on Violence Against Women & Children, Communications & Public Affairs, Equity & Human Rights Services, Housing & Ancillary Services, Indigenous Services, School of Graduate & Postdoctoral Studies, Student Development Centre, Student Health Services, Western International, as well as students and community partners.  In 2015-2016 academic year members of this committee created a consent poster campaign and consent awareness video - that went viral and hosted two forums on the topic of consent and engaging men in sexual violence prevention. Plans for this year include another forum, training for staff and faculty and a dedicated campus wide Consent and Sexual Violence Awareness Week, scheduled for October 17-23.



March 31, 2016

Position marshals resources against sexual violence

Paul Mayne // Western News

Everyone has a role to play in Angela Treglia’s job.

“It’s all of our responsibilities to look at ways we can educate ourselves, and each other, on prevention,” said the university’s Sexual Violence Prevention Education Co-ordinator. “Sexual violence is not a woman’s issue; it affects all of us. We all need to be doing something.”

In the role for two months, Treglia previously worked as a Residence Manager and, more recently, as Program Co-ordinator for Housing and Ancillary Services, where her focus was on sexual violence awareness. She believes her new role is a natural progression from there.

“My passion lies in sexual violence prevention work,” said Treglia, who is on a one-year secondment. “It’s something that really connects for me. It’s a topic near to my heart.”

This new position is something the university, along with the University Students’ Council (USC) and Society of Graduate Students (SOGS), wanted to initiate for some time. Funding from the Ontario Women’s Directorate made the position possible.

“We’ve been pushing for a position like this to ensure that conversations happening on a committee level don’t stay within those meetings,” Alex Benac, USC Vice-President (Internal), said last fall. “We needed someone to enact organized, cross-campus campaigns and that’s where this role comes in.”

Previously, the subject of ‘sexual violence’ fell to a host of departments and individuals across campus. This new role provides a centralized approach for the university.

Treglia is not a counsellor. She acts as a resource for individuals who have experienced sexual violence, as well as for those supporting survivors of sexual violence, by helping them navigate the system. Her work focuses on supporting students who are survivors of sexual violence.

“The survivors who come in my office are such amazing and strong individuals; the resiliency you see and hear, the strength is awesome and very powerful for me,” she said.

While victim focused, Treglia said she would never turn anyone away. She also helps faculty and staff understand how they can better support their students.

“Sometimes survivors don’t want to come into my office because I am a stranger to them. Most will disclose to their friends before going to any sort of authority figure, such as myself, the police or administration,” said Treglia, who promises confidentiality in all her conversations. “Sometimes those friends will be wondering how they can offer support. They can contact me to help them be aware of the resources they can share, so no matter who a survivor comes out to, they get a compassionate response and they (friend) will know who to refer them to.”

Some grant money will be used to improve Western’s Upstander Programming, which aims to develop a culture of looking out for one other on campus. Through training programs, educational videos and awareness weeks, the plan is to have a campus community where students and staff are equipped with skills to intervene in any situation that may negatively impact the Western community.

The need is in the numbers. Studies suggest 67 per cent of all Canadians personally know at least one woman who has been sexually or physically assaulted.

“It is not isolated and it is not a new issue. It has been around forever. We are seeing it talked about as more and more survivors are coming forward. That has a lot to do with decreasing the stigma,” Treglia said. “When you look at the statistics, they have stayed fairly consistent over decades. That is troubling. There is a serious issue that has been left unaddressed for so long.”

In recent years, Western has taken a number of steps to prevent and respond to sexual violence, including:

In September 2014, Western adopted its first standalone Policy on Sexual Violence. Prior to that, sexual violence was – and still is to some extent – addressed by both the Code of Student Conduct and Non-Discrimination/Harassment Policy.

All this adds to the mix of a university taking the issue seriously.

“Not to take away from the work that has been done by so many over the years,” Treglia said, “but we are at a stage now where people, the government and university administration are getting involved. A lot of key pieces are now coming together.”

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MAKE A CONNECTION

Located in the basement of the University Community Centre (UCC), the Wellness Education Centre (Room 76) is open 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday to Friday. Western Sexual Violence Prevention Education Co-ordinator Angela Treglia can be reached at atregli@uwo.ca or 519-661-2111 Ext. 87085. For more information, visit safecampus.uwo.ca/sexual_violence.